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New CAS report: Postive outlook for China's low carbon development

Date
02 March 2009

A new report from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) says that China can successfully curb and cap emissions and develop a low carbon economy

The publication, which includes input from leading universities, think tanks, and NGOs in the region, offers a strong and positive assessment of China's ability to decouple future economic growth from its emissions.

The Climate Group's Greater China team contributed to two chapters, "International Experiences of Low Carbon Economy and Implications for China" and "Strategy of Low Carbon Pathway with Chinese Characteristics."

Key findings of the report include:

. By 2020, China can reduce the energy intensity of GDP between 40 and 60% compared to 2005 levels, thereby reducing {CO2} emission intensity of GDP by about 50%.

. With strict measures on energy conservation and emissions and emission controls in place, China can feasibly cap emissions between 2030 and 2040.

It is the first time that the Chinese Academy of Sciences has taken China's low carbon development as the focus of its annual Sustainable Development Strategy Report.

The influential report, which will be distributed to delegates of China's National People's Congress (NPC) and the Chinese People's Political Consultative Committee (CPPCC), includes suggestions for a national low carbon development strategy. It explores the technologies, sectoral strategies, and policy instruments that would enable the achievement of these targets; it also considers prospects for developing low carbon cities in China.

Changhua Wu, Director of The Climate Group, Greater China, welcomed the publication. "By systematically articulating all aspects of the low carbon economy, including the science, policy, politics, technology, and by shaping China's strategy and roadmap for a low carbon transition, the report will serve as a useful reference for key decision-makers to reshape China's national development strategy."

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