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South Australia launches solar feed-in scheme to promote renewable energy use

Date
13 August 2007
South Australia launches solar feed-in scheme to promote renewable energy use

The Climate Group member South Australia has released an unprecedented solar "feed-in" legislation, this move by the State Government will see home owners with solar panels receive double credit for power they feed back to the grid.

Amendments to the Electricity Act 1996 will be introduced to create a scheme that will reward owners of residential solar photovoltaic installations for the excess electricity they return to the grid.

The Electricity (Feed-In Scheme - Residential Solar Systems) Bill 2007 will allow domestic customers who operate a small-scale grid-connected photovoltaic electricity system to receive 44 cents per kilowatt-hour of electricity fed back into the grid - twice the standard retail price.

State Premier, Mike Rann said "South Australia is leading the nation and other states have begin showing interest in following our lead. South Australia already has around 46 per cent of the nation's grid-connected solar panels, and this feed-in scheme will play on the State's existing strength. This scheme represents another step in keeping South Australia at the forefront of governments facing the challenge of climate change."

Chris Leigh, Director of The °Climate Group's Cities and States Programme congratulated the new billl: "The °Climate Group strongly welcomes this initiative from South Australia which should encourage greater take up of small scale renewable energy generation and can act as a benchmark for other states and regions to follow."

The State's Climate Change legislation sets out three targets - to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 60 per cent of 1990 levels by the end of 2050, and to increase renewable electricity generation and consumption so it makes up at least 20 per cent of electricity in the State by the end of 2014.

The draft Bill will be available for viewing online from today at www.climatechange.sa.gov.au.

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