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UN Secretary-General urges action on the IPCC's findings

Date
22 November 2007
UN Secretary-General urges action on the IPCC's findings

Last week's formal launch of the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report in Valencia provided yet another grim warning of what will happen if the world does not take immediate action to cut the greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change.

Not known for hyperbole, the panel of leading climate scientists declared that global warming is now "unequivocal." In advance of crucial UN climate negotiations in Bali next month, their report concludes that warming is the result of increased concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and that these concentrations "have increased markedly as a result of human activities since 1750 and now far exceed pre-industrial values".

The report also demonstrates clearly that without immediate action, the rate of global warming can only accelerate.

Such acceleration would see increasing severity of the impacts - including flooding, drought, disease, crop failure and species loss - already being felt around world.

Welcoming the report, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said: "The message it contains could not be simpler.The threat of climate change is real and there are concrete and affordable ways to deal with it."

The °Climate Group has identified these affordable solutions and how they have been implemented across numerous sectors and countries. Ranging from energy efficiency to renewable energy, transport planning to low carbon design, these solutions have achieved emissions cuts far beyond those demanded by the Kyoto Protocol - all while saving or even making money for those employing them.

At the report launch, the UN Secretary-General called on "political leaders to .agree not only to launch negotiations, but also to conclude them by 2009."

The °Climate Group supports fully this call. Both the magnitude of the potential impacts and the availability of options for a rapid transition to a low carbon but prosperous economy mean that world leaders should agree to binding absolute cuts in emissions without further delay.

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